Easter Eggs & Traditions

IMG_6260 Easter eggs, also called Paschal eggs, are decorated eggs that are often given to celebrate Easter or springtime.   As such, Easter eggs are common during the season of Eastertide (Easter season). The oldest tradition is to use dyed and painted chicken eggs.   Eggs, in general, were a traditional symbol of fertility, and rebirth.  In Christianity, for the celebration of Eastertide, Easter eggs symbolize the empty tomb of Jesus, though an egg appears to be like the stone of a tomb, a bird hatches from it with life; similarly, the Easter egg, for Christians, is a reminder that Jesus rose from the grave, and that those who believe will also experience eternal life.

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We follow the tradition of dying eggs each year.  This is always been a fun family activity for us and brings out the artists in all of us….well, mostly Nate, Megan & Kelly.  I usually just copy.  haha~  So this year, I bought the dying tablets and put out some colored sharpies and said…”lets decorate!”  We started out slow (as always), then Nate came up with his idea and I think that kick-started the rest of us.  I think he gets his talents from his dad.

I can do flowers.

I can do flowers.

The Master’s is next weekend~

The Master’s is next weekend~

I told Nate that I should’ve done a pumpkin on those orange ones.  He thought that was funny and liked the idea…then this appeared. IMG_6252   I loved the girls eggs, as always.  Megan made a purple sun that I thought was an evil eye and she double-dipped with a pink and purple.  Turned out neat. IMG_6254 Kelly was inspired by Megan’s spring break picture of the sea turtles in Texas.  I love the green for the water.  Cute! IMG_6258 Although the tradition is to use dyed or painted chicken eggs, a modern custom is to substitute chocolate eggs, or plastic eggs filled with candy such as jellybeans. These eggs can be hidden for children to find on Easter morning, which may be left by the Easter Bunny. They may also be put in a basket filled with real or artificial straw to resemble a bird’s nest. Easter egg hunts and egg rolling are two popular egg-related traditions.

In the U.S., the White House Easter Egg Roll, a race in which children push decorated, hard-boiled eggs across the White House lawn, is an annual event held the Monday after Easter. The first official White House egg roll occurred in 1878, when Rutherford B. Hayes was president. The event has no religious significance, although some people have considered egg rolling symbolic of the stone blocking Jesus’ tomb being rolled away, leading to his resurrection.

President And Mrs. Obama Host Annual Easter Egg Roll At White House

The largest Easter egg ever made was over 25 feet high and weighed over 8,000 pounds. It was built out of choclate and marshmallow and supported by an internal steel frame.

Delicious!

Delicious!

Easter Bunny: The Bible makes no mention of a long-eared, short-tailed creature who delivers decorated eggs to well-behaved children on Easter Sunday; nevertheless, the Easter bunny has become a prominent symbol of Christianity’s most important holiday. The exact origins of this mythical mammal are unclear, but rabbits, known to be prolific procreators, are an ancient symbol of fertility and new life.

He is adorable tho~

He is adorable tho~

Eventually, this custom of the bunny spread across the U.S. and the fabled rabbit’s Easter morning deliveries expanded to include chocolate and other types of candy and gifts, while decorated baskets replaced nests. Additionally, children often left out carrots for the bunny in case he got hungry from all his hopping. Easter Parade In New York City, the Easter Parade tradition dates back to the mid-1800s, when the upper crust of society would attend Easter services at various Fifth Avenue churches then stroll outside afterward, showing off their new spring outfits and hats. Average citizens started showing up along Fifth Avenue to check out the action. The tradition reached its peak by the mid-20th century, and in 1948, the popular film Easter Parade was released, starring Fred Astaire and Judy Garland and featuring the music of Irving Berlin. The title song includes the lyrics: “In your Easter bonnet, with all the frills upon it/You’ll be the grandest lady in the Easter parade.

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The Easter Parade tradition lives on in Manhattan, with Fifth Avenue from 49th Street to 57th Street being shut down during the day to traffic. Participants often sport elaborately decorated bonnets and hats. The event has no religious significance, but sources note that Easter processions have been a part of Christianity since its earliest days. Today, other cities across America also have their own parades.

Love it!

Love it!

Traditional Easter Foods Although colored hard-boiled eggs are probably the first Easter food to come to mind, other foods factor into the traditional Easter meals around the world. Hot Cross Buns are an Easter favorite in many areas. The tradition allegedly is derived from ancient Anglo-Saxons who baked small wheat cakes in honor of the springtime goddess, Eostre. After converting to Christianity, the church substituted the cakes with sweetbreads, blessed by the church.

Need to learn how to make these.

Need to learn how to make these.

Countries around the world serve sweet cakes in the same vein, such as Czech babobka and Polish baba. The Greeks and Portugese serve round, flat loaves marked with a cross and decorated with Easter eggs. Syrian and Jordanian Christians have honey pastries. In the United States, ham is a traditional Easter food. In the early days, meat was slaughtered in the fall.  There was no refrigeration, and the fresh pork that wasn’t consumed during the winter months before Lent was cured for spring. The curing process took a long time, and the first hams were ready around the time Easter rolled around. Thus, ham was a natural choice for the celebratory Easter dinner.

Now I’m getting hungry!

Now I’m getting hungry!

Have a wonderful Easter everyone!   Happy Spring~

Love my spring chicks!

Love my spring chicks!

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5 comments

  1. Cool blog, Cathy! We colored eggs at Chad & Jody’s last night and Hayley was asking where the customs started. Now we can tell her! Have a wonderful Easter… Jere

  2. Someone has been doing her research! VERRRRRY interesting! Lots of artwork done of those eggs.Excellent blog. Happy Easter! The Wisconsin Solbergs

  3. Really talented artists in the Solberg family,beautiful colors too. I think next year you all need to make and wear an Easter bonnet whilst decorating your eggs.intersting blog again,Thankyou for sharing.

  4. Glad you all enjoyed this easter blog. It’s always fun doing this research on things I thought I’d already known and find out, I know nothing! haha.

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